Tag Archives: featured

Jack Hues and the Muse: The First Thing You Need is Music

In the world of rock and pop music, the most successful musicians and groups tend to emerge in their early 20s with a burst of creativity that few can sustain past a handful of recordings. Unlike in classical music and jazz, where musicians and composers continually develop and evolve well into old age, rock musicians generally […]

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The Touch of Your Lips, Part III: The Essential Touch in Jazz Piano

It would be nice and tidy if the development of tone color as a primary in jazz piano matched its development in the other instruments, but that is not the case. From early on in jazz’s history, composers and bandleaders like Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Cab Calloway, and others were focused on the different tone […]

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The Touch of Your Lips, Part II: Touch and Tone Color in Jazz Piano

  As mentioned in Part I, tone color took on a prominent role in classical music in the 19C. The Romantic composers like Wagner, Strauss, Berlioz, Chopin and many others were, I think it is fair to say, somewhat obsessed with it. The composers before them were certainly aware of tone color, but it was […]

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The Touch of Your Lips: The Colors of Jazz Piano

  “Technique is a matter of training the fingertips to attack and leave the keys under the absolute discipline of the brain. Touch has a much broader and wider significance. It is touch that reveals the soul of the player.”1 [italics added]    Ossip Gabrilowitsch, concert pianist/conductor (and Mark Twain’s son-in-law) The idea that pianists are able […]

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Hot Fusion II: U.K.’s First Album “U.K.”

Prologue: In the second part of this series, I laid out my criteria for what would constitute a fusion of jazz and rock that remained true to both styles, which, in my definition, means that the resultant music would have to appeal to both rock and jazz fans, which is not an easy task. Steely […]

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We’re All Minimalists Now: The Ghost of the Monastery that Haunts the Modern World

A Brief History of the Minimalist Aesthetic Minimalism is defined by Merriam-Webster as “a style or technique (as in music, literature, or design) that is characterized by extreme spareness and simplicity.”  Musically speaking, this translates to a few characteristics common to most pieces: Slow-moving or static harmony, Small number of repetitive and simple rhythmic figures, […]

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Hot Fusion I: Steely Dan’s Aja

Hot Fusion I: Steely Dan’s Aja I ended the first part of this series with the question that prompted these articles: “Why is there so little music that genuinely fuses two styles together and does so in a way that maintains the integrity of the stylistic contributors?” I could have phrased in differently by asking […]

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Cold Fusion: The Search for the Jazz/Rock Unicorn

Part I: A Brief Stylistic History The fusion of different styles of music has been an explicit goal of many musicians in the 20C. In the early part of the 20C, many classical composers like Bela Bartok, Aaron Copland, Maurice Ravel, and Claude Debussy were interested in incorporating early jazz and ethnic folk music into […]

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New Rock Vistas: MCC, Part II, Interview with Martin Persner

Martin Persner kindly agreed to an interview for this article, which follows as Part II of a two part series on MCC. ASF: What is the musical background and training of the members? MP: Most of us are self-taught but we were brought up in more or less musical homes. Me and Arvid (my kid brother) […]

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New Rock Vistas: The Gaze of Future’s Past

Rock is Dead? Long live the Hip-Hop King? Not so fast—while it is true that Hip-Hop/R&B have surpassed Rock in sales in the US, sales are probably not the best measure for the health of an art form. Sales figures measure popularity and revenue, which occasionally, but not often, coincide with innovative artistry. Perhaps it […]

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