Tag Archives: Jazz

Music and Politics: Strange Bedfellows Get Stranger

Politics and music often cross paths. Most often, musicians use their celebrity pulpit to stump for candidates or to bring attention to a cause. Politicians, like many others, use music as a marketing tool (think of Clinton’s first campaign with Fleetwood Mac’s Don’t Stop (Thinkin’ About Tomorrow) which was featured prominently throughout as well as […]

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The C Major Scale is an F Major Chord: George Russell and Paul Hindemith

No commentary on this one, I’m just pondering this quote from the late George Russell’s “Lydian Chromatic Concept of Tonal Organization.” Russell (who was called “The Invisible Guru” by Ian Carr) was a deep thinker whose philosophical approach to music influenced the development of jazz profoundly. (I haven’t seen evidence of that myself, but some […]

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Jazz Evolution: What happened to “Locked Hands” and “Drop-2”?

Note: If you’re not a jazz pianist/instrumentalist or jazz composer/arranger, this post might not be of much interest, but it’s a question I’ve wondered about for many years. —————————————————————————————————————————— There are two jazz piano voicings (closely related) known colloquially as “Locked Hands” and “Drop-2” voicings. In Locked Hands (often also referred to as the “Shearing […]

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All Dressed Up And Nowhere To Go: Fashion and Marketing in Jazz

Here’s an article from theroot.com that I found interesting entitled “Who Ever Said Jazz Had to Be Drab?”. Not me, and that’s for sure. I didn’t let the dogs out either. The article features 15 “edgy jazz musicians” who are “fashion-forward” and are “rocking” the stage in “decidely 21st-century mode.”  Here are the Jazz Fashionistas: 1. Cassandra Wilson: […]

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C-Jazz Blues: Epitaph for the Calgary Jazz Festival

As a followup to my previous post (“Another one bites the dust”) on the cancellation of the Calgary Jazz Festival: ESTATE SALE: Apparently now it’s time to sell the furniture in a last-ditch effort to squeeze every last penny out of the deceased. I get a queasy feeling reading this–as if they’re digging the gold […]

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Improvisation and the Eternal Ephemeral

A great deal has been said about the reasons that jazz has lost its audience: “It doesn’t swing anymore, and if it doesn’t have that swing quality or characteristic, it doesn’t mean as much as it otherwise would if it had that certain swing to it.” ”You can’t dance to it anymore. I can’t even […]

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Lara Pellegrinelli’s NPR Jazz Blog: Meet the Jazz Audience (Do I have to?)

An interesting set of posts from Lara Pellegrinelli (NPR journalist, A Blog Supreme). Pellegrinelli interviews attendees at New York jazz festival events. 1. Funniest post This one is very entertaining (interviewee is in post-coital bliss after attending a Chris Botti concert). Pellegrinelli sets the bait masterfully, which is then swallowed  whole. Favorite quotes: Q: What brings you […]

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Another one bites the dust: Calgary Jazz Festival cancelled

Calgary Jazz Festival Cancelled. This is really sad news.  I attended the Calgary festival several times while living in Alberta, and it was an outstanding jazz event.  Mostly great listening venues, many  world class players, and they also showcased some of the incredible talent from Calgary and Edmonton.

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Why I Hate Rhythm Changes: Looking Deeper than the Form

Bob Hartig and I have gone back and forth in a “point counter point” type of discussion on our opinions on the venerable 32-bar form known “Rhythm Changes.” (Bob’s original post here.  My response here.) Bob then responded with “Why I STILL Love Playing Rhythm Changes” which left the door open for me to even […]

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Jazz in Crisis: Part II

Jazz in Crisis: Part II Yes, jazz is in a state of crisis; “the fabled days of yore are gone,and no amount of education or archaic posturing is going to bring them back by attracting or enthralling an obviously disinterested public.”  And yet, I do think that we live in a time of remarkable creative […]

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