NoJazzFest for Old Men

Jazz Fest 2012 by Terrance Osborne Bruce Springsteen, The Eagles, Foo Fighters, Florence and the Machine, Bonnie Rait, Ziggy Marley, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Cee-Lo,and Ne-Yo. Where did all of these artists perform?  Exactly–at the New Orleans Jazz Festival! (Which, strangely enough, also enjoyed its “biggest crowd ever.”) In addition, here are the other headliners […]

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The Audience and the Educator: A Study in Blue

I’ve written about what I call “the education fallacy” in earlier posts: The solution [to building a sustainable audience base for jazz], we’ve all been told ad nauseum, is “Education! Teach jazz in the schools, and we’ll be creating new audiences and supporters for the future.” This theory rests on a fallacy—namely, that jazz is such […]

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If You Fund It, They (Still) Won’t Come

Q: Save the arts? Really? Why do so many people think the arts need saving? Do we need to save the arts, and if so, what does saving them mean?* Why do so many people think the arts need saving? Well, first of all, the arts bubble from the latter half of the last century […]

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Interview with Jack Hues from Wang Chung and The Quartet

After my post about Wang Chung, I received a lot of emails with followup questions. My post was linked on Wang Chung’s website, and Jack  told me how much he enjoyed the post. So, I asked him if he would consider answering some of those questions and he graciously agreed to do so. I think it’s […]

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Tinker, Tailor, Soldier. Why?

Q: Many countries have ministries of culture. Does America need a Secretary of Culture or Secretary of the Arts? Why or why not? This question gets us into an area we haven’t specifically dealt with yet in the contest, namely politics. The broader issue here revolves around government funding of the arts, which is a good […]

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The Muse That Roars

Q: We live in an aggressively visual age; images dominate the popular culture. But which art form has the most to say about contemporary culture, and why? It’s impossible to deny the premise of this question–the evidence that we are a visually dominated culture is everywhere to be found. Thirty years ago in most markets, there were […]

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The Cultural Capital of Everywhere

Q: New York has long been considered the cultural capital of America. Is it still? If not, where? New York has indeed long been considered the cultural capital of America, and for good reason. The history of 20C music, art, film, and to a lesser extent, literature, can hardly be imagined without the city’s influence […]

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JEN and JAI: The Jazz Education Network and the Jazz Audiences Initiative (or, “They’re just not that into you.”)

In January, I attended the 2012 Jazz Education Network (JEN) conference in Louisville, Kentucky. It was my first time attending this (relatively) new organization’s conference. I had avoided going previously because I was still smarting from the self-inflicted spontaneous combustion of the International Association of Jazz Educators (IAJE) in 2008. The JEN conference was similar to […]

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A Followup to Kickstarter and Kickbacks: Pomplamoose goes begging

I’ve had quite a few people ask me about a response to my recent blog post about Kickstarter and Pomplamoose from Kia Kamran, an LA entertainment lawyer who works with/manages/represents Pomplamoose. I wasn’t going to comment on it, but there’s quite a bit of interest, so I decided to write a “followup” to the original post. […]

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The Payton Bait ‘n Switch: Nicholas Payton in Grand Rapids

I went to see the famous jazz trumpeter, Nicholas Payton, perform in the magnificent Royce Auditorium at St. Cecilia’s Music Center in Grand Rapids, and on that night, I did something I have never, ever done before: I walked out in the middle of a concert that I paid good money to attend. I have […]

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